Nova 2013 - Delphini

IMAGE DETAILS

Object ............................................  PNV J20233073+2046041
Constellation ..............................  Delphini
Distance + Ap. Magnitude.......   --  - 6.8 (at discovery date)
RA / DEC ..................................... 20h:23m.30sec / +20 46m.04sec
 

Date + Time ...............................   18 / 8/2012 - 09:00 UTC
Location ....................................  
Remote imaging from iTelescope.net - Sliding spring Australia
Optics .........................................
 
Planewave T30 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph + CCD + f/4.5 focal reducer
Tools ..........................................   Maxim dl
Camera .....................................  
FLI-PL6303E  CCD camera
Exposure Time.......................     Luminance: ---  R: 10X 60sec
More Details ...........................    Environment Temperature : ---  Camera Temperature -35οC
Mount .......................................   Planewave
Guiding ....................................   Unguided
Processing Details ................    Photoshop , Maxim ,
Notes ........................................   Weather: ---  - Transparence: ---  - Humidity : 36%

Target details .........................    
Nova 2013 Delphinus , discovered by Mr Koichi Itagaki (Teppo-cho, Yamagata, Japan)
on 14th of August 2013 with magnitude 6.8
A nova (plural novae or novas) is a cataclysmic nuclear explosion in a white dwarf star. It is caused by the accretion of hydrogen on to the surface of the star, which ignites and starts nuclear fusion in a runaway manner. Novae are not to be confused with supernovae or luminous red novae. A nova is a sudden brightening of a star. Novae are thought to occur on the surface of a white dwarf star in a binary system. If these two stars are close enough, material from one star can be pulled off the companion star's surface and onto the white dwarf.
Subtypes
Novae are classified according to the light curve development speed, thus in

  • NA: Fast novae, with a rapid brightness increase, followed by a brightness decline of 3 magnitudes to about 116 brightness within 100 days.
  • NB: Slow novae, with a 3 magnitudes decline in 150 days or more.
  • NC: Very slow novae, staying at maximum light for a decade or more, fading very slowly. It is possible that NC type novae are objects differing physically very much from normal novae, for example planetary nebulae in formation, exhibiting Wolf-Rayet star like features.
  • NR/RN: Recurrent novae, novae with two or more outbursts separated by 1080 years have been observed

Nikos Paschalis